Yoga for Lyme Disease

Yoga for lyme disease- is yoga helpful for people living with this illness?

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged ticks.  The ticks must remain attached to the body for at least 36-48 hours to transmit the disease.  

The ticks must remain attached to the body for at least 36-48 hours to transmit the disease.  Symptoms of lyme disease include rash, fever, headache, and joint pain in the early stages. In the later stages symptoms include arthritis, shooting pains, nerve pains, inflammation, and more.  Basically, you’re like Peter Parker getting bitten by a radioactive spider, but instead of gaining super cool spidey senses from this unrequested encounter, you gain new senses of pain.  Each year in the United States, approximately 30,000 cases of Lyme Disease are reported to the

Basically, you’re like Peter Parker getting bitten by a radioactive spider, but instead of gaining super cool spidey senses from this unrequested encounter, you gain new senses of pain.  Each year in the United States, approximately 30,000 cases of Lyme Disease are reported to the

Each year in the United States, approximately 30,000 cases of Lyme Disease are reported to the CDC.  Sadly, the CDC predicts that the number of Americans with lyme disease is actually much higher and that the lower number of cases reported is due to misdiagnosis.

If you have lyme disease or know someone suffering from lyme disease, do not lose hope.  Instead, try something that can help both your body and spirit; try yoga for lyme disease.  The poses can relieve physical symptoms of lyme disease such as stiffness, pain, and inflammation. Breathing and meditation practices also work to relieve both physical and mental strain by calming the mind, which calms the nervous system, and releasing negativity so that positive healing can begin.  While you can practice yoga for lyme disease in your home, you can also join a class that feels right for you and relieve another symptom that lyme disease may have caused you: isolation.

Try this yoga for lyme disease routine:

  1. Reclining Mountain Pose: To get the most out of this pose, lay down with your feet flat against the wall and your knees slightly bent.  Then push against the wall until your legs are fully extended, effectively extending the spine and flattening the pelvis.  Lay with your palms facing the ceiling as they rest either by your sides or above your head.  This pose helps you gain awareness of which joints are stiff and need further focus while also allowing your mind to relax in sync with your body. This pose is similar to Savasana (corpse pose) where you lie passively on the mat. The only difference is that in mountain pose, you are lying down while also using your muscles to be aware of your posture. 

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  1. Bridge Pose: Lay on your back with your legs spread hip-width apart and your knees bent.  Place your palms face down and keep them at your sides as you lift your hips and then your chest towards the ceiling.  You can use a cushion under your shoulders and a block under your hips as necessary to relieve strain on the body. If you’re having a low energy day, placing a block under the hips makes this a passive pose. Exhale and roll out of the pose when you’re done.  This pose energizes and strengthens the body while stimulating the endocrine and nervous systems.

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  1. Staff Pose: Sit flat on the floor with your legs touching and extended in front of you and your spine extended to it’s full length upwards (do not slouch!).  Sit against a wall if necessary to relieve strain.  Place your palms on the floor at your sides and keep your feet flexed, toes pointing towards the ceiling.  This pose strengthens core muscles and hip flexors and stretches the legs, relieving stiffness.

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  1. Modified Lotus Pose: The modified version of this pose will look similar to sitting criss-cross-applesauce (also known as pretzel style).  Although this pose is modified, it is important to keep a proper, but comfortable angle in the legs.  To do this, sit on the floor and extend both legs forward.  Take the right leg and bend the knee to the side as you place the right foot flat against your still straightened left leg and slowly bring it closer to your groin.  Once you have brought the right foot as close as is comfortable, pick the right leg up and maintain the angle of the knee as you twist the leg at the hip joint until your right foot is as close to the left hip joint as is comfortable.  Repeat this process with the left leg. This pose opens the hips, knees, and ankles and stretches the hip flexors, relieving stiffness and increasing mobility.

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This routine is great because the difficulty and length of each pose can be further modified to whatever level your body can handle as you begin and then modified again later on as both your body and mind improve.  This routine also helps get blood flowing without causing problems with dizziness or blood pressure that can be caused by sudden standing.

Blogger Meryl Cohen says of her experience doing yoga for lyme disease, “In times of despair and loneliness, as well as in times of joy and peace, I can stretch, breathe, sit back into child’s pose, and for a moment, things feel settled and safe. Yoga is my lifeline, and will continue to be. When adversity hits me over the head, I simply pull out my mat, and take a breath.”

Yoga for lyme disease is not a cure, but it is a tool that YOU can use to take back control of YOUR life. If you’re looking for a way to take back control, try yoga for lyme disease.

Have you done yoga for Lyme disease? What were your experiences like?? Let us know in the comments!

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